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5-HTP Benefits Explained

5-Hydroxytryptophan simply known as 5-HTP is one that indicates and precedes to the Neurotransmitter Serotonin a substance that transmits nerve impulses across the gap between neurons and an intermediate in the tryptophan metabolism.

5-HTP is an amino acid, a supplement that has been proposed to control serotonin levels in people who are suffering painful uneasiness of mind or people who are under pressure or strain. Continuous research has been proven to have this effect on serotonin in the central nervous system. Serotonin is the one responsible in the regulation of sleep, mood, temperature balance, appetite, sexual behaviors and pain sensation.

Another research has been shown useful in some conditions characterized in part by serotonin deficits, mostly psychological disorder marked especially by sadness, inactivity, difficulty in thinking and concentration, and feelings of dejection.

5-HTP can be used as nutrient support. It helps regulate normal body function. In some cases like insomnia, obesity, chronic tension, headache and fibromyalgia, 5-HTP made some patients to feel better.

5-HTP’s Psychoactive Action

It is accepted to obtain from its effect on serotonin synthesis. To increase production, the brain’s serotonin producing neurons and it is believed that it is caused by an artificially high level of 5-HTP. Increase of serotonin production leads to increased release.

It is said that 5-HTP is suggested to be administered with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor by some clinicians. That is to prevent elevated serotonin levels in the bloodstream and the subsequent side effects.

5-HTP is generally used to aid disorders such as depression, anxiety problems, insomnia, migraines, weight loss, and fibromyalgia.

Recent studies are made trying to make a conclusion if whether or not 5-HTP is effective and the results are as follows:

Sixty three people were prescribed 100mg of 5-HTP during the six-week period and there appear to be an outcome similar to a prescribe serotonin increaser prescription drug or anti depressant medication. This concludes that 5-HTP indeed is a beneficial treatment for depression.

Though as much as 600mg of 5-HTP was given to participants and sufferers of migraines, 5-HTP showed small signs of helping to prevent migraines. After six months of continuous use, some claimed that it was as effective as their prescription medicines.

Over a four-week period, a double blind study using a placebo where 50 people suffering from fibromyalgia participated in the research and then afterwards, they noticed a small improvement with the help of 5-HTP. Fibromyalgia is a condition that includes fatigue, and enormous joint and muscle pain.

There is a limitation in taking 5-HTP. People who would like to use 5-HTP as a supplement should first consult their physicians if they would take it together with other prescribed drugs. It should also be noted that 5-HTP should not be taken together with carbidopa, dextromethorphan, or tramadol. Also, women should avoid using 5-HTP without consulting their physicians. Using 5-HTP while nursing or pregnant has not been studied.

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Are There Side Effects of Taking FRS Healthy Energy? (FRS Healthy Energy Drink Side Effects-Dangers)

Since this is often being called the healthiest energy drink on the market, it’s important to learn about any side effects of taking FRS Healthy Energy drink before allowing it into our bodies.

FRS Healthy Energy has proven its benefits including decreased fatigue, increased energy and endurance, sharper focus and concentration, and improved overall health.

It seems that there are no known side effects of FRS Healthy Energy drink for almost all normal, healthy people, but a deeper look at the key ingredients can help determine if people with specific food allergies or people who are taking certain medications might experience negative side effects if taking FRS energy drink.

Caffeine in FRS Healthy Energy

First off, energy drink caffeine in excessive amounts is never healthy. Anywhere from 200-300 mg of caffeine a day is generally considered a healthy amount to stick to.

Depending on your age, weight, smoking habits, drug and medicine use, stress levels and other health factors, consuming 500-600 mg of caffeine in a day may have such health risks and side effects as heart arrhythmia, insomnia, nervousness, irritability, anxiety, muscle tremors, headaches and nausea.

Thankfully, FRS Healthy Energy derives its caffeine primarily from green tea extract, and a single serving contains only 48mg of caffeine, which is about the amount of a half a cup of coffee.

You would need to drink about 11 cans of FRS energy supplement in a single day in order to risk the harmful side effects of caffeine. I should hope this won’t not be a problem! The FRS Healthy Energy company themselves recommend consuming three servings per day for optimal results.

The caffeine in FRS is meant to enhance the uptake and processing of the key ingredients (namely, quercetin and B-vitamin) rather than to directly give energy.

Quercetin in FRS Healthy Energy

Quercetin is the secret to FRS Healthy Energy’s patented ingredients. This powerful antioxidant helps turn your body into its own energy-production powerhouse.

Normal, healthy people should not be concerned with any side effects of the quercetin in FRS energy drink, but here are some known medication interactions that you should be aware of depending on what drugs you’re currently taking.

While it is unclear the specific nature of the interaction, it is believed that there is a reaction between quercetin and antibiotics. Until more definitive research emerges, it’s important to be aware of this possibility.

FRS quercetin is also thought to have an interaction with some metabolic enzymes, which has lead to theories that FRS might have the ability to increase the effects of some medications on the body. While this has not been proven, it’s wise to bear in mind if you are someone who takes a lot of medications and has sensitive or unstable health.

Food Dyes in FRS Healthy Energy

Finally, there are trace amounts of food dye in FRS drinks, so if you are someone who suffers from a severe allergy to food dyes, then it would be best to avoid this product completely just to be safe.

Bottom Line: Are There Any FRS Healthy Energy Drink Side Effects?

For almost all healthy individuals, FRS energy supplement does not have any known side effects. As with anything though, make sure to drink FRS in reasonable quantities. If you do experience any negative side effects, stop or reduce consumption.

The natural and healthy ingredients in FRS Healthy Energy should actually provide you with more health benefits than negative side effects. The only known and documented effects are increased energy, drive and focus as well as a boost in overall health.

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Top Mistakes People Make When Taking Testosterone Replacement Therapy

I have heard of so many mistakes being made by people taking testosterone replacement therapy. Some mistakes seriously impacted their quality of life, or resulted in men stopping testosterone prematurely. Here are a few of the biggest errors I’ve witnessed:

  1. Using “street sources” of testosterone: I have met many men whose doctors do not support their use of testosterone, so they buy it on the black market or from some guy at their gyms. This is illegal. Testosterone is classified as a controlled substance under the Anabolic Steroids Control Act of 1990 and has been assigned to Schedule III. It is regulated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). A doctor can legally prescribe it but it is illegal to use without a prescription. Be aware that the buying or the using of testosterone without a proper prescription may have legal consequences. The use of testosterone and its cousin molecules (anabolic steroids) is illegal in the United States for those without a medical diagnosis that justifies their use (e.g. anemia, wasting, hypogonadism). If after reading this book you still decide to get testosterone in the black market, be beware that you could set up by informants who may alert the DEA of your purchase. Also, importing testosterone even if you have a prescription is not legal. In a nut shell: only use testosterone after a physician gives you a prescription and do not import it from other countries.
    • The use of “street” testosterone is also dangerous. No one knows what those products may contain. Some so-called testosterone products may simply contain peanut oil, sesame or grape-seed oil. You also run the risk of exposure to contaminants that could cause infection.
    • Not having a doctor follow-up your blood work is a sure way to get in trouble! If you have low testosterone, there are hundreds of doctors who will prescribe testosterone replacement therapy (refer to the Appendix section for directories). If you are using testosterone to increase muscle mass or to improve athletic performance even though you have normal testosterone levels, be smart and research all you can. And please, read the information in this book about how stopping testosterone can cause health problems (if you are using black market testosterone, chances are that your source will eventually run out).
  2. Not exploring what testosterone option is best for you: Since there is an assortment of options for testosterone replacement, it’s important that you take the time to really find out what’s best for you. Several factors are involved in deciding what would be the best testosterone replacement option for you. Among them are cost, insurance coverage, convenience, preference for daily versus weekly use, lack of time to stick to a strict daily schedule, fears of needles, and physician familiarity of the different products. For instance, some health management organizations (HMOs) programs only pay for testosterone injections since they are the cheapest option. However some men have needle-phobia and dislike weekly or bi-weekly injections that may require them to go see their doctors that frequently (some doctors do not teach their patients to self inject at home). Other men are prescribed daily gels even if their busy lives make it difficult to be perfectly compliant to the daily therapy. Some men without insurance or financial means decide not to seek help since they do not know that there are patient assistance programs set up by manufacturers, or the fact that compounding pharmacies can make cheap gels and creams with a doctor prescription (details on this information is available in the Appedix section). Every testosterone option has advantages and disadvantages that may be more suitable for one person over another, so read the following section on treatment options.
  3. Not using the right dose: Men who start testosterone need to have their testosterone blood levels rechecked twoweeks or one month after they start therapy (depending on the testosterone formulation), right before they administer the corresponding dose for that day or week. This is critical since these results are essential to deciding if the dose is right for you. Total testosterone blood levels under 500ng/dL that are not improving your sexual desire and energy should be increased to 500to 1,000ng/dL by increasing the frequency of injection or the dose.Some doctors fail to retest after they get a patient started on testosterone since they assume most men respond to 200 mg bi-weekly injections or 5 grams per day of gels. The reality is that many men require higher doses to reach total testosterone levels above mid range of normal. Those men tend to stop testosterone early because they perceive no benefits at “average”doses. Incorrect frequency of injections is a common mistake and is actually worse than not getting treatment at all. See the next sections for more details on this.
  4. Cycling on and off testosterone: Testosterone replacement is a life-long commitment in most cases. Once you start you should assume that you will stay on it unless you have an unmanageable side effect. Some patients think that “giving the body a break” once every few weeks is a good thing. What they do not know is that during the time that you are taking testosterone, your testicles stop producing it. When you stop replacement therapy you are left with no testosterone in your system for weeks while your HPG hormonal axis normalizes. Depression, weight loss, lack of motivation, and loss of sex drive can appear rapidly and with a vengeance. A few men never have their hormonal axis return to normal after stopping testosterone (especially if they were hypogonadal at baseline). Read more details on this in the section entitled “HPGA dysfunction.”
  5. Stopping testosterone abruptly due to an unrelated signal: Some of us may be taking medications for other conditions along with testosterone. Sometimes new medications can increase cholesterol and triglycerides and/or liver enzymes (I call these “signals”). Some doctors prematurely blame testosterone instead of the new medications that someone might have started. I have seen people suffer because of this poor judgment of their doctors. Weeks later, they learn that stopping testosterone did not improve any of these problems but by then they feel tired, depressed, and asexual.
  6. Not knowing how to manage potential side effects: Luckily, this will not happen to you after you finish reading this book. I know men who stopped testosterone due to swelling in their nipple area, acne, moodiness, perceived lack of benefit, hair loss, or a prostatic specific antigen (PSA) increase that was due to a prostatic infection. Knowing how to manage these side effects is essential to long-term success. If you know what side effects may occur and how to deal with them, you are less likely to prematurely stop therapy. You may just need to readjust the dose, change the delivery method, or take a medication to counteract the potential problem. Only the best physicians, who do not overreact to a side effect, know how to do this.
  7. Having a life style that is not “testosterone friendly”: If you smoke, drink more than two drinks a day, smoke too much pot, are overweight, do not exercise, do not keep your blood sugar or lipids in control, and do not show up to doctor’s appointments, you do not have a testosterone-friendly lifestyle. Studies have shown that these factors may influence your sexual function and long-term health. Excessive alcohol can decrease testosterone. Exercise can increase it if done properly or decrease it if overdone. You can read more about this later in this book.
  8. Not reading or staying “networked” with other patients: Being in isolation about information makes you a less effective patient. There are online groups of men who discuss testosterone and other issues (see the Resource section). Sharing your experiences and learning from others are keys to being an empowered and proactive patient. It’s the only way to maximize the benefits of any therapy you are using. Many of the practical “tricks” that I have learned have been obtained via this method. The collective wisdom of other people with similar issues is more powerful than just relying on everything your doctor tells, or does not tell you. Besides, most doctors treat educated patients a lot better than those who are timid about sharing and asking questions.
  9. Not switching doctors when you have to: Changing doctors can be difficult, especially if you are not a networked patient who reads a lot about your condition. Many people do not have options and have to see a certain doctor in a health management orga­nization (HMO) setting. But most of us have the option of searching for educated doctors who are not condescending and who treat you as an equal. Your doctor should be your partner in your health and not just an unquestioned authority. Although they are saving lives and have spent hundreds of hours in school and practice to do so, they are human beings who are exposed to myths and misconceptions similar to ours I have heard the most irrational things from doctors about testosterone replacement that make me question how unfortunate their patients may be. Be sure to do your homework and find a doctor who supports you in your search for optimum health. See the Resource section for directories of physicians who are trained in testosterone replacement management.
  10. Poor compliance: Forgetting when to inject or apply gels is a common complaint. Good time management and reminders are key. Find reminders that work for you. I use Google calendar which can be set up to send me text messages to my phone as reminders. Avoid the yo-yo effect that poor compliance causes! Testosterone replacement is a lifetime and life style commitment that should be explored with care.

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The Dangers and Benefits of St John’s Wort

St. John’s wort is possibly the most well-known of natural supplements for depression by dint of the excellent response it’s produced in clinical trials. This amazing herb has shown to be effective against depression, anxiety and even insomnia as well as helping to strengthen the immune system and relieve muscle pain. So why doesn’t everyone use it? Well, as with any supplement or prescription medication, one size does not fit all. Take a look at some of the pros and cons associated with this drug, then consider having a discussion with your doctor about whether or not this would be a viable option for you.

Pros

As previously mentioned, St. John’s wort has shown to be effective against depression ranging in severity from mild to moderately severe. In fact, in clinical trials St. John’s wort tested as comparable to prescription medications such as Paxil and Zoloft. St. John’s wort does this naturally with much fewer side effects than prescription drugs and generally much cheaper. Every time you start taking a prescription antidepressant there’s a chance that it will cause adverse effects in your body including dizziness, fatigue, lack of sex drive and weight gain as well as a chance that it simply won’t work at all…or worse, have the opposite effect.

In short, if you’re looking for something that’s natural, has a low risk of side effects, works well and is cost-effective, St. John’s wort may be just the thing for you. Additionally, St. John’s wort does not seem to produce the same kind of addictive effect that prescription drugs are known for.

Cons

While St. John’s wort appears to have much less severe side effects than prescription medications, there are still indications that there are still some side effects. These side effects are not proven to be a result of the supplement, but some people reported dizziness, nausea and decreased sex drive while on St. John’s wort.

Bear in mind that this supplement is definitely not for everyone. Namely, anyone with bipolar disorder should not take the supplement; if you’re unsure of whether you have bipolar disorder or not then make sure you only proceed under the close supervision of a doctor because St. John’s wort, as with medications such as Paxil, can be hazardous for bipolar patients because they do not have a mood stabilizer and can cause a very dangerous dysphoric mania.

What to Look for and What to Expect

If you just pick a St. John’s wort supplement off the shelf without knowing what you’re looking for, there’s a good chance you’re wasting your money. Many of these supplements on the market have low or no hyperforin content and so will be ineffective in treating depression, so make sure you select a supplement that specifically states a 3-5% hyperforin content.

St. John’s wort builds up slowly over time in the body, so expect to take the supplement daily for about six weeks before you see any results, though some people do see results sooner. If all goes well, you will see substantial alleviation of depression symptoms after that time with few or no side effects.

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7 Health Benefits of Cyanidin 3-Glucoside

Cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G) is a water-soluble plant compound that is part of the anthocyanins category. It plays an active role in producing the dark color pigments in a variety of fruits and flowers. This natural substance is primarily sourced from fruits and vegetable with dark skins such as purple potatoes, blueberries, plums, blackcurrants, and black rice.

Most people already get a certain amount of cyanidin 3-glucoside in their diet, but this is usually at a negligible amount. It is possible to increase the intake of this substance by making a change in the diet or taking it in supplement form.

Here are seven of the potential health benefits for increasing the intake of cyanidin 3-glucoside:

Antioxidant

The rich antioxidant content of this compound helps the body neutralize the build up of free radicals. Free radicals develop when oxygen is able to interact with specific molecules. By neutralizing the free radical damage, it is possible to minimize the risk of serious disease such as certain cancers (skin, prostate, lung, and colon) and heart disease.

Atherosclerosis

The risk of atherosclerosis is lowered with an increased intake of cyanidin 3-glucoside. Atherosclerosis is a condition that relates to the build up of plaque on the artery wall which prevents the proper blood flow throughout the system. If the artery walls are restricted too much because of the hard plaque this can increase the risk of suffering from a heart attack.

Diabetes

It has the ability to help suffers of type-2 diabetes because of its ability to increase insulin sensitivity and reduce glucose levels.

Anti-inflammatory

Foods rich in cyanidin 3-glucoside can help to increase the body’s ability to fight-off inflammation, which has the negative effect of causing serious health conditions.

Eye health

This plant compound has the ability to regenerate rhodopsin, which is essential to let the retina absorb light. A benefit of this is the ability to improve night vision. Plus, the rich antioxidant content is believed to have a positive effect of slowing the development of age related eye diseases such as macular degeneration.

Tissues

The powerful antioxidant properties in cyanidin 3-glucoside make it useful to tissues by slowing the aging process, fighting off DNA damage, and preventing the formation of cancerous cells by encouraging apoptosis, which is the programmed death of diseased cells.

Fat loss

For the bodybuilder there is the potential to increase muscle gain and reduce fat gain because this compound has the ability to improve insulin sensitivity, which is useful for providing more carbohydrate calories and protein to muscle cells.

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The Ingredients of Stacker Fat Burners

Stacker fat burners can be great for burning fat, building muscle, increasing energy and helping with your weight loss program. While stacker fat burners can vary slightly, most have generally the same basic ingredients.

Ephedra is a common ingredient found in fat burners such as Original stacker 2 with ephedra or Stacker 3 Original with Chitosan and Ephedra. You will often see Ephedra listed in the ingredients as Ma Huang. Ephedra works to increase your metabolism which in turn increases your body heat. It works as a stimulant on your brain. It increases your heart rate as well as expanding the bronchial tubes.

White Willow Bark is basically aspirin. It is actually the bark of the white willow tree. It has long been used for medicinal purposes, such as controlling fevers and reducing pain. Aspirin works in combination with ephedra and caffeine in order to produce weight loss.

Kola Nut Extract or Gurana provides caffeine. Caffeine is a stimulant as well. It is naturally found in these herbs. Caffeine helps you lose water weight, can work to decrease your appetite, and can also help your body lose weight in a more rapid fashion.

Chitosan is another common ingredient found in stacker fat burners. Chitosan is actually part of the exoskeleton of shrimp and crabs. It is included in fat burners because it is said to have the ability to attract fat and pull the fat out of the body during digestion. Having chitosan included in a stacker fat burner can help you lose additional weight without diet.

Citrus aurantium is often used in products which are ephedra free. It has been used in Chinese medicine for a very long time to treat chest colds. It works in a similar way as ephedra, working as a stimulant to increase energy and metabolism and help to breakdown fat. It has also been shown to help control your appetite.

Guggulsterones come from a tree that is often found in India. It works to increase thyroid output which helps with increasing metabolism.

Green tea is often touted as an ingredient that does not have any negative side effects. It is a strong antioxidant, and also helps to increase energy.

There are many excellent choices as Stacker 2 Lite and Stacker 2 XPLC Fat burners which contain different combinations of ingredients which allow you to pick the stacker fat burner which best fits your needs.

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Macro and Micro-Nutrient in Eggs

Eggs have been a staple in the human diet for thousands of years. From hunter-gatherers collecting eggs from the nests of wild birds, to the domestication of fowl for more reliable access to a supply of eggs, to today’s genetically selected birds and modern production facilities, eggs have long been recognized as a source of high-quality protein and other important nutrients.

Over the years, eggs have become an essential ingredient in many cuisines, owing to their many functional properties, such as water holding, emulsifying, and foaming. An egg is a self-contained and self-sufficient embryonic development chamber. At adequate temperature, the developing embryo uses the extensive range of essential nutrients in the egg for its growth and development. The necessary proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and functional nutrients are all present in sufficient quantities for the transition from fertilized cell to newborn chick, and the nutrient needs of an avian species are similar enough to human needs to make eggs an ideal source of nutrients for us. (The one essential human nutrient that eggs do not contain is ascorbic acid (vitamin C), because non-passerine birds have active gulonolactone oxidase and synthesize ascorbic acid as needed.) This article summarizes the varied nutrient contributions eggs make to the human diet.

Macro and Micro Nutrient in Eggs

The levels of many nutrients in an egg are influenced by the age and breed or strain of hen as well as the season of the year and the composition of the feed provided to the hen. While most variations in nutrients are relatively minor, the fatty acid composition of egg lipids can be significantly altered by changes in the hen’s diet. The exact quantities of many vitamins and minerals in an egg are determined, in part, by the nutrients provided in the hen’s diet. Hen eggs contain 75.8% water, 12.6% protein, 9.9% lipid, and 1.7% vitamins, minerals, and a small amount of carbohydrates. Eggs are classified in the protein food group, and egg protein is one of the highest quality proteins available. Virtually all lipids found in eggs are contained in the yolk, along with most of the vitamins and minerals. Of the small amount of carbohydrate (less than 1% by weight), half is found in the form of glycoprotein and the remainder as free glucose.

Egg Protein

Egg proteins, which are distributed in both yolk and white (albumen), are nutritionally complete proteins containing all the essential amino-acids (EAA). Egg protein has a chemical score (EAA level in a protein food divided by the level found in an ‘ideal’ protein food) of 100, a biological value (a measure of how efficiently dietary protein is turned into body tissue) of 94, and the highest protein efficiency ratio (ratio of weight gain to protein ingested in young rats) of any dietary protein. The major proteins found in egg yolk include low density lipoprotein (LDL), which constitutes 65%, high density lipoprotein (HDL), phosvitin, and livetin. These proteins exist in a homogeneously emulsified fluid. Egg white is made up of some 40 different kinds of proteins. Ovalbumin is the major protein (54%) along with ovotransferrin (12%) and ovomucoid (11%). Other proteins of interest include flavoprotein, which binds riboflavin, avidin, which can bind and inactivate biotin, and lysozyme, which has lytic action against bacteria.

Egg Lipids

A large egg yolk contains 4.5 g of lipid, consisting of triacylglycerides (65%), phospholipids (31%), and cholesterol (4%). Of the total phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) is the largest fraction and accounts for 26%. Phosphatidylethanolamine contributes another 4%. The fatty-acid composition of eggyolk lipids depends on the fatty-acid profile of the diet. The reported fatty-acid profile of commercial eggs indicates that a large egg contains 1.55 g of saturated fatty acids, 1.91 g of monounsaturated fat, and 0.68 g of polyunsaturated fatty acids. (Total fatty acids (4.14 g) does not equal total lipid (4.5 g) because of the glycerol moiety of triacylglycerides and phospholipids and the phosphorylated moieties of the phospholipids). It has been reported that eggs contain less than 0.05 g of trans-fatty acids. Egg yolks also contain cholesterol (211mg per large egg) and the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin.

Egg Vitamins

Eggs contain all the essential vitamins except vitamin C, because the developing chick does not have a dietary requirement for this vitamin. The yolk contains the majority of the water-soluble vitamins and 100% of the fat-soluble vitamins. Riboflavin and niacin are concentrated in the albumen. The riboflavin in the egg albumin is bound to flavoprotein in a 1:1 molar ratio. Eggs are one of the few natural sources of vitamins D and B12. Egg vitamin E levels can be increased up to tenfold through dietary changes. While no single vitamin is found in very high quantity relative to its DRI value, it is the wide spectrum of vitamins present that makes eggs nutritionally rich.

Egg Minerals

Eggs contain small amounts of all the minerals essential for life. Of particular importance is the iron found in egg yolks. Research evaluating the plasma iron and transferrin saturation in 6-12-month-old children indicated that infants who ate egg yolks had a better iron status than infants who did not. The study indicated that egg yolks can be a source of iron in a weaning diet for breast-fed and formula-fed infants without increasing blood antibodies to egg-yolk proteins. Dietary iron absorption from a specific food is determined by iron status, heme- and nonheme-iron contents, and amounts of various dietary factors that influence iron absorption present in the whole meal. Limited information is available about the net effect of these factors as related to egg iron bioavailability. In addition to iron, eggs contain calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium, zinc, copper, and manganese. Egg yolks also contain iodine (25 mg per large egg), and this can be increased twofold to threefold by the inclusion of an iodine source in the feed. Egg selenium content can also be increased up to ninefold by dietary manipulations.

Egg Choline

Choline was established as an essential nutrient in 1999 with recommended daily intakes (RDIs) of 550mg for men and 450mg for women. The RDI for choline increases during pregnancy and lactation owing to the high rate of choline transfer from the mother to the fetus and into breast milk. Animal studies indicate that choline plays an essential role in brain development, especially in the development of the memory centers of the fetus and newborn. Egg-yolk lecithin (phosphatidylcholine) is an excellent source of dietary choline, providing 125mg of choline per large egg.

Egg Carotenes

Egg yolk contains two xanthophylls (carotenes that contain an alcohol group) that have important health benefits – lutein and zeaxanthin. It is estimated that a large egg contains 0.33 mg of lutein and zeaxanthin; however, the content of these xanthophylls is totally dependent on the type of feed provided to the hens. Egg-yolk lutein levels can be increased up to tenfold through modification of the feed with marigold extract or purified lutein.

An indicator of the luteinþzeaxanthin content is the color of the yolk; the darker yellow-orange the yolk, the higher the xanthophyll content. Studies have shown that egg-yolk xanthophylls have a higher bioavailablity than those from plant sources, probably because the lipid matrix of the egg yolk facilitates greater absorption. This increased bioavailability results in significant increases in plasma levels of lutein and zeaxanthin as well as increased macular pigment densities with egg feeding.

Egg Cholesterol

Eggs are one of the richest sources of dietary cholesterol, providing 215 mg per large egg. In the 1960s and 1970s the simplistic view that dietary cholesterol equals blood cholesterol resulted in the belief that eggs were a major contributor to hypercholesterolemia and the associated risk of cardiovascular disease. While there remains some controversy regarding the role of dietary cholesterol in determining blood cholesterol levels, the majority of studies have shown that saturated fat, not dietary cholesterol, is the major dietary determinant of plasma cholesterol levels (and eggs contain 1.5 g of saturated fat) and that neither dietary cholesterol nor egg consumption are significantly related to the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Across cultures, those countries with the highest egg consumption actually have the lowest rates of mortality from cardiovascular disease, and within-population studies have not shown a correlation between egg intake and either plasma cholesterol levels or the incidence of heart disease. A 1999 study of over 117 000 men and women followed for 8-14 years showed that the risk of coronary heart disease was the same whether the study subjects consumed less than one egg a week or more than one egg a day. Clinical studies show that dietary cholesterol does have a small influence on plasma cholesterol levels. Adding one egg per day to the diet would, on average, increase plasma total cholesterol levels by approximately 5mg dl_1 (0.13mmol/L). It is important to note, however, that the increase occurs in both the atherogenic LDL cholesterol fraction (4mg dl_1(0.10mmol/L)) and the antiatherogenic HDL cholesterol fraction (1 mg dl_1(0.03mmol/L)), resulting in virtually no change in the LDL:HDL ratio, a major determinant of cardiovascular disease risk. The plasma lipoprotein cholesterol response to egg feeding, especially any changes in the LDL:HDL ratio, vary according to the individual and the baseline plasma lipoprotein cholesterol profile. Adding one egg a day to the diets of three hypothetical patients with different plasma lipid profiles results in very different effects on the LDL:HDL ratio. For the individual at low risk there is a greater effect than for the person at high risk, yet in all cases the effect is quantitatively minor and would have little impact on their heart-disease risk profile.

Overall, results from clinical studies indicate that egg feeding has little if any effect on cardiovascular disease risk. This is consistent with the results from a number of epidemiological studies. A common consumer misperception is that eggs from some breeds of bird have low or no cholesterol. For example, eggs from Araucana chickens, a South American breed that lays a blue-green egg, have been promoted as low-cholesterol eggs when, in fact, the cholesterol content of these eggs is 25% higher than that of commercial eggs. The amount of cholesterol in an egg is set by the developmental needs of the embryo and has proven very difficult to change substantially without resorting to hypocholesterolemic drug usage. Undue concerns regarding egg cholesterol content resulted in a steady decline in egg consumption during the 1970s, 1980s, and early 1990s, and restriction of this important and affordable source of high-quality protein and other nutrients could have had negative effects on the well-being of many nutritionally ‘at risk’ populations. Per capita egg consumption has been increasing over the past decade in North America, Central America, and Asia, has remained relatively steady in South America and Africa, and has been falling in Europe and Oceania. Overall, world per capita egg consumption has been slowly increasing over the past decade, in part owing to the change in attitude regarding dietary cholesterol health concerns.

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How Much Fiber Should You Have While Bulking?

Fiber is an essential thing to think about when sorting out a diet, and even more vital when bulking. Its the main factor that leads to smooth sailings and healthy intestines. It may be something that you can put to the back of your mind, but by the end of this article I hope to give you a few things to take away and think about, including: what exactly it is, why you need enough, what the consequences are of having too little, and a list of foods that are high in fiber.

What is fiber?

Fiber is a plant-derived carbohydrate that your body cant absorb and digest. It keeps your digestive lining healthy by taking out excess cholesterol, hormones, toxins and fat. By doing that, fiber prevents a lot of unwanted nasties, such as, high blood pressure, colon cancer, cardiovascular disease diverticulitis and constipation.

To properly understand this carb, you need to know the different types. Fiber comes in two forms, soluble (dissolves in water) and insoluble (doesn’t dissolve in water). When combined together, they play a massive role for overall health and wellbeing. Soluble fiber, when combined with food and water in your stomach, creates a gel like substance which lubricates the insides, making it easier to excrete the food, while insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool which gives you the urge to go to the toilet, resulting in a healthy and efficient digestive system.

Getting enough while bulking

As you can probably tell, you need much more fiber when you’re on a bulk as you’re eating far more calories. With the added food, you need more lubrication and bulk to get the same outcome as on a normal diet with a normal level of fiber. When a lot of people on a bulk increase their calories, they choose foods which are dense in calories and usually healthy, but not necessarily high in fiber, so they’ll be consuming roughly the same amount, creating imbalances.

You already have your hands full with your workouts, meals and sleeping, so that last thing you want is to have another thing to worry about while you’re confined to the toilet, pushing as hard as you can (sorry for the imagery).

What are some foods high in fiber?

– Bran (corn, wheat, oats, brown rice)

– Dried herbs, spices and peppers

– Cocoa powder

– Dark Chocolate

– Seeds (flax, sesame and sunflower)

– Soybeans

– Nuts

– Fruits (passion fruit, apples, pears, bananas etc.)

– Metamucil (fiber supplement)

Yeah, I know.. topics such as fiber isn’t all that exciting to think about, but it’s important nonetheless, and can have amazing benefits if you get enough.

A quick tip to leave you with: You generally want to be going number 2 1-2 times a day. If that lowers when you’re on your bulk, it’s a sure sign that you need to up your fiber intake, so look at the list above and get eating. If it doesn’t help, try a fiber supplement. If that doesn’t help, contact your local GP as something else may being going on.

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Total Gym Reviews

Total Gym is a home fitness system that adds an effective new dimension to using your own bodyweight to build strength.  Using a platform and pulley system,  this home fitness system allows you to build strength, increase flexibility and add significant muscle tone.  It can also deliver a nice cardiovascular workout.  Many people are familiar with Total Gym because of celebrity spokespeople Chuck Norris and Christie Brinkley.

You may be familiar with the Total Gym Systems because of the frequently broadcast infomercials with the aforementioned celebrities.  But our experience is that  this home fitness system is more than just a fanciful workout system played with by already wealthy celebrities as they sip their chilled pear nectar by the poolside in Maui.  It is a simple to use home workout system that can significantly build strength and conditioning.  As an added bonus, it also stores extremely easily and can fold up under  bed or be conveniently placed in a closet. 

If your desire is to gain substantial muscle mass, then in all liklihood, then this is probably not the best system for you.  However, if your aims are to increase overall strength and fitness, to increase flexibility, and if you like a workout that has that very natural feel that comes with lifting your own body weight, then the this system might be a great fit for you. Another very common question is whether this home fitness system can afford a significant cardiovascular workout.  This depends of course on your current cardio capacity, but using it for at least 20 minutes at a rapid pace with minimal rest time should afford a significant cardio workout.  This can always be supplemented with a nice brisk walk or jog.

You can check out the full PEERtrainer review of the three best Total Gym models on the PEERtrainer blog.  The links to this blog post can be found below.

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Do 8-Pack Abs Really Exist?

Are 8-pack abs a myth or magic? You may want to know if it’s really soon after you acquire your 6-pack abs. But the first question you need to ponder on is, is there any difference between a 6-pack abs and an 8-pack abs?

Before you start counting on the number of packs, think that an 8-pack abs is actually a super defined 6-pack abs. If you cannot see any difference between the two, as there exists but only so subtle, remember that an 8-pack abs will give you physical advantages not available to those having a 6-pack abs.

The eight pack of an 8-pack abs can be found in the lower abdomen just below the six pack and it is actually a midsection that is lean and well-toned.

While both eight pack and six pack compose the rectus abdominus muscle group, it is the tendons that separate and distinguish each from the other.

Unfortunately, not all gentlemen are endowed with a gift of further achieving an eight pack. Genetics plays a main role in getting an 8-pack abs and will serve as a final arbiter if a 6-pack abs is all that you can make. There are some signs that manifest if you have the genes for achieving an 8-pack abs. See if the tendons of your lower abdomen are still large ad taut and if they are you may be lucky to further develop that pay of your abdomen for an 8-pack abs.

People who are consuming terrible portions of fat, sugar, and alcohol won’t be getting either of the 6-pack abs or 8-pack backs. It goes to show that only the determined and the disciplined ones will be getting them.

If you have worked your way out to achieve a 6-pack abs through rigorous exercise and a strict diet, developing an 8-pack abs also consists of the same mechanism: tone up muscles and lose fats.

The twofold tasks can be accomplished with having a low fat, low sugar diet, weight training, and cardiovascular exercise. It sounds similar to getting a 6-pack abs but reaching to the other level is difficult and can even be frustrating sometimes.

Your diet should consist of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats and poultry, fresh fish, sufficient fiber, and lots of water.

Aside from the aerobic cardiovascular exercises, you will also need to incorporate 20-30 minutes of cardio exercises into your daily routine. It is okay to be persistent but don’t tire yourself by adding another 30 minutes extra.

Free weight training also helps in burning fat and building muscle through elevating your body temperature. It is important that exercises should focus on your midsection when you’re doing your abdominal routine. Do exercise with high resistant and low reps to make your abdominal muscles grow and eliminate fats.

An 8-pack abs is yours to achieve given the following formula: good genes, proper diet, and abdominal exercises that focus on the midsection.

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